Statement on Historic Environment Scotland refusal of Scheduled Monument Consent

Frank Strang, CEO of Shetland Space Centre, said: “We are greatly surprised that Historic Environment Scotland (HES), an organisation that has done nothing to preserve the site for the last 50 years, has refused Scheduled Monument Consent, particularly given that the Shetland regional archaeologist saw no reason to object to our plans in principle.
“We will now review in detail the reasons behind the HES decision and our understanding of that will inform our next move. Our team will take stock and hopefully enter into constructive dialogue with HES to allow them the appropriate comfort to allow consent.
“But be in no doubt: we will vigorously contest HES’s refusal of permission to develop and enhance a site which, while evidently of national significance, has for years been left in a dilapidated state. Our mitigation plans include the provision of resurfacing and repairing the visitor road access, building of an interpretation centre and public conveniences as well as the creation of local jobs. Our plans show little or no negative impact on the old RAF concrete buildings and by melding the old with the new will create economic prosperity in Unst and Shetland for years to come.”

German rocket maker plans to launch from Unst

Shetland Space Centre secured a further boost today with a German rocket maker announcing its intention to launch from Unst. 

HyImpulse Technologies plans to begin engine testing and launching sub-orbital sounding rockets in Shetland this year with a view to a maiden orbital flight in 2023. 

The company has pioneered environmentally-friendly hybrid fuel technology which will be deployed in all launches. 

HyImpulse Co-CEO Christian Schmierer said: “We have signed letters of intent with several potential customers to take their payloads into orbit. 

“It was therefore very important for us to secure a launch pad and site ahead of time and to start with our mission planning. 

“Shetland Space Centre allows us to offer frequent, reliable access to space with a great variety of efficient flight routes.” 

CEO Mario Kobald added: “Our engine will be green and we are pleased to see their emphasis on environmental and social responsibilities.”  

Shetland Space Centre CEO Frank Strang said: “We are truly international in our outlook and are delighted that long discussions with Christian, Mario and their team through our German subsidiary have culminated in common activities starting this year. 

“Post-Covid, we look forward to welcoming everyone associated with the HyImpulse project to Shetland and to the beginning of a strong partnership.”  

Prospect of major boost to Shetland economy as space launch site plans lodged

The creation of a space launch facility in Unst will result in hundreds of new jobs and significantly boost the local economy.

Major planning proposals have now been submitted to Shetland Islands Council on behalf of Shetland Space Centre by town planning consultants Farningham Planning Ltd.

The proposals take the form of three separate but related planning applications, including the launch site at Lamba Ness.

Provision is made for the construction of three launch pads and associated infrastructure incorporating a satellite tracking facility, hangarage and integration facilities, the creation of a range control centre at the former RAF Saxa Vord complex, use of the fuel storage facility at Ordale Airport at Baltasound, and significant improvements to the launch site’s approach roads.

The proposals also include the building of a wildlife hide at Lamba Ness to help facilitate enhanced public access for the enjoyment of bird and orca watching.

Supported by a thorough and extremely comprehensive Environmental Impact Assessment Report (EIAR) prepared by a team of experienced specialist environmental consultants, the application, if successful, will be a major economic boost to the North Isles, Scotland and the UK.

The launch facility will eventually create circa 140 jobs on Unst and inject at least £4.9m per annum into the island’s economy. It will provide a further 70 jobs throughout Shetland, adding a further £2.9m in gross value per annum to the economy.

The EIAR, authored by ITPEnergised, concludes that the launch facility will have no or negligible impact on all local bird species except for one confidential Schedule 1 breeding species which may be subject to minor disturbance. Carefully considered mitigation measures have been identified to ensure there is as little disturbance as possible.

The EIAR further states that due to the intermittent nature and short duration of the rocket launches and engine tests, the effects of noise associated with these activities will be much less than initial concerns voiced by local residents anticipated, and will actually be less than that historically associated with Baltasound Airport when it was active and when the RAF was operational at Saxa Vord.

The report acknowledges there will be an obvious effect on the degraded infrastructure at the former RAF Skaw and on the setting of Inner Skaw Scheduled Monuments.

However, a comprehensive programme of measures is proposed to refurbish and enhance the dilapidated assets to encourage more visitor footfall to the site and provide greater understanding and appreciation of its significance, melding the old aerospace with the new.

Scott Hammond, Shetland Space Centre project director, said: “The economic decline of Unst since the closures of Baltasound Airport and RAF Saxa Vord has been well documented.

“We believe our proposals will help regenerate the island by providing skilled jobs and helping with repopulation that can only benefit the social fabric, including the school, health centre and small businesses. The space industry attracts young people and the island needs a healthy population of young families to maintain economic viability.”

Frank Strang, CEO of Shetland Space Centre, said: “Scott and Alan Farningham and his team have assembled a very comprehensive and detailed application that has taken over two years to produce.

“In many ways the UK is in very new territory and while there are other spaceports situated elsewhere in the world, we are just starting out on the journey and it is very important that we get it right.

“We are trying to portray all the positive aspects of the new space economy and hopefully light a small beacon of hope in these dark times, not just for the Shetland economy but Scotland and the UK in general.”

Shetland Space Centre secures investment from Wild Ventures Limited

The Shetland Space Centre is pleased to announce that it has secured a significant minority investment from Wild Ventures Limited.

It follows the UK Space Agency’s announcement last month that Lockheed Martin is transferring its satellite launch initiative to Unst to deliver long-term value for the industry and help establish a sustainable, commercial launch market as part of the UK’s spaceflight programme – LaunchUK.

Wild Ventures Limited is a sister company to Wildland Limited formed to facilitate direct investment into projects with potential long term economic benefits for Scotland’s rural areas.

Welcoming the investment, Frank Strang, CEO of Shetland Space Centre, said: “They have done their diligence on the space economy and got to grips with their understanding of the industry and the commercial realities of the space sector.

“The Scottish Space Leadership Council and Scottish Spaceports Alliance are united in their belief that space is a force for good and that the technologies associated with the sector can be harnessed to support initiatives that protect the environment. 

“All the various facets associated with the space sector, such as sustainability, STEM, education, business start-up, research and development and innovation, are core to the Wild Ventures ethos and we are completely aligned in our vision as to how space science and nature can combine to create an exemplar.”

Wild Ventures Limited has looked at all the prospective Scottish spaceport sites and they believe that the Shetland location combined with its business model affords the best chance for sustainable success for Scotland and the UK.

Tim Kirkwood, for Wild Ventures Limited, said: “We have long been supportive of the idea that, if developed appropriately, the space industry can deliver great benefits for Scotland’s rural economy. What is needed is the right development in the right place.

“As a project involving an ex-RAF base, a brownfield site, a promising location, and now with backing from HIE, the UKSA and Lockheed Martin, it has become clear that Shetland Space Centre is a realistic investment prospect to be asked to be involved with.

“Even so, a planning application for a sensitive area has yet to be lodged and a high environmental bar will need to be thoroughly crossed. As a minority investor we look forward to watching its progress with interest.”

The Wild Ventures investment amounts to £1.43m.

Transfer of Lockheed Martin UKVL Pathfinder Programme to Unst

Shetland Space Centre today welcomed the announcement from the UK Space Agency that Lockheed Martin is transferring its satellite launch operations to Unst, creating hundreds of jobs.

UKSA said that the move from Sutherland followed a thorough process of due diligence and the project would deliver long-term value and help establish a sustainable, commercial launch market as part of the UK’s spaceflight programme – LaunchUK.

Shetland Space Centre anticipates that by 2024, the spaceport site could support a total of 605 jobs in Scotland including 140 locally and 210 across the wider Shetland region. A further 150 jobs will also be created through wider manufacturing and support services.

Lockheed Martin is in discussions with a preferred partner to provide launch services for its UK Pathfinder Launch, which would take place from Shetland Space Centre.

Frank Strang, CEO of SSC, said: “We are absolutely delighted to be welcoming Nik Smith and the Lockheed Martin team to Unst as we develop Shetland Space Centre.

“The UK is in a space race with other countries in Europe and beyond, such as Norway, Sweden and New Zealand, to supply payload space in a rapidly growing international market, and we intend to exploit our favourable geographical position to meet this demand.

“The benefits for Shetland, Scotland and the UK of Pathfinder and the additional launch projects that we are actively working on, in terms of skilled jobs, are evident.

“As well as launch, we aim to offer a full range of services, including telemetry, tracking and navigation, space situational awareness and data download and storage.

“We look forward to deepening our good relationship with Lockheed in the months and years ahead.

“This is a significant moment, and we intend to succeed in this new space race. The sky is no longer the limit.”

UK Government science minister Amanda Solloway said: “We want the UK to be the best place in Europe to launch satellites, attracting innovative businesses from all over the world and creating hundreds of high-skilled jobs.

The potential to have multiple spaceports in Scotland demonstrates the scale of our ambition, and I want to support industry by pressing ahead with our plans during this challenging time.

“This government is committed to backing our growing space sector, developing a comprehensive space strategy and supporting transformative technologies that will benefit people and businesses across the country.”

Ivan McKee, Scottish Government minister for trade, investment and innovation, said: “This is an extremely exciting time for the emerging space sector globally, and Scotland is situated at the very forefront of this.”

Nik Smith, UK country executive at Lockheed Martin, said: “The UK has a vibrant space sector, which can stimulate the national as well as regional economies. As a long-standing strategic partner to the UK, Lockheed Martin is committed to building on its proud heritage to support the UK government’s role of growing capabilities in space, exciting imagination and advancing the frontiers of science.

“From the outset our focus has been on realising the greatest economic benefit for the UK through the Spaceflight programme. The transfer of our UK spaceflight operations to Shetland will not only broaden launch options available in the UK, but also ensure the economic benefits of these endeavours are felt more widely.”

Brother and sister from Aith triumph in space art contest

The winners of Shetland Space Centre’s art contest, whose prize is a trip to Cape Canaveral in Florida, are a brother and sister from Aith.

Signe and Lockie Bullough, aged eight and 10, submitted a joint entry of a female astronaut with a puffin on top of her helmet and a rocket taking off in the background. The pair have an Unst connection as their mum, Lynn Ritch, is from the island.

Theirs was one of a remarkable 192 entries received, and the quality of the submissions was so high that the judges decided to award prizes to three children in three different age groups, five-seven, eight-11 and 12+. They will each receive a voucher for Mareel.

They were (five-seven): first Aly Work (aged seven), second Isla Somerville (six) and third Thea Tallack (six).

(Eight-11): first Levi Cogle (10), second Rashik Saravanan (10) and third Vaila Gunn (eight).

And 12+: first Prasheeta Saravanan (13), second Connie Dickie (16) and third Emma Henry (14).

SSC administrator Carol Duncan, who judged the entries along with SSC director of Shetland operations Yvette Hopkins, Graeme Howell, chief executive of Shetland Arts, and Unst artist Pat Cerasale, said: “It was a fantastic competition, with a really high standard of entry.

“Congratulations to Signe and Lockie, who will be heading off to Florida along with their mum and dad when the travel situation returns to normal.

“We will shortly be putting up a selection of the artworks on our website for all to see, as they deserve to be seen.”

 

SSC replaces face to face meetings with phone calls

Shetland Space Centre is replacing its planned face to face meetings during this week’s round of public consultation events with phone calls after the latest Covid-19 advice from the Scottish Government. 

The online events, from 4pm to 8pm on Tuesday 13th, Wednesday 14th and Thursday 15th October, will still go ahead. They can be accessed via https://consultation.shetlandspacecentre.com

Instead of the proposed face to face meetings, however, members of the Shetland Space Centre team will be available by phone in half hour slots from 12pm to 3pm. These appointments can be booked by emailing inf[email protected] 

The online consultation event will be attended by the project’s lead planning consultant, Alan Farningham, SSC project director Scott Hammond and experts who have been carrying out studies as part of the Environmental Impact Assessment that will be submitted with the planning application. They will be available to answer questions and provide any additional information or clarification as required.

Isles innovators urged to head online to learn about support and funding

Do you have a great idea that you think could be a big deal in technology or manufacturing? But you’re not sure about what steps to take next?

Local individuals, companies and organisations with innovative schemes in mind are invited to a free virtual event on Thursday 29th October where they can find out how to access support and funding.

The event, from 09.30-13.30, is being hosted by Shetland Space Centre, Shetland Islands Council and the Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA), a Government organisation that directly funds innovative ideas that benefit the UK’s Armed Forces and national security.

Speakers will attend from organisations covering a wide range of interests, including artificial intelligence, downstream use of satellite data, defence and security, the internet of things and a range of other technology.

In addition to SSC, SIC and DASA, the organisations include Censis, The Data Lab, ESA Business Applications, KTN, Innovate and Interface.

Yvette Hopkins, SSC director of Shetland Operations, said: “We are pleased to be joining with SIC and DASA in hosting this virtual event to highlight not only the wide range of organisations that can help support and fund your innovations, but the innovative mindset and business acumen resident in Shetland.

“SSC looks forward to potentially working together with local businesses, academia and innovators on forward thinking ideas and concepts to support our spaceport plans for Unst.”

Maggie Sandison, Chief Executive of Shetland Islands Council, said: “New technologies and projects such as the Shetland Space Centre offer local companies and individuals the chance to get involved in innovative and creative work.

“This event provides a chance to see what kind of support is out there, and I hope, provides individuals and local businesses with a sense of the range of new opportunities that exist even in the particularly challenging economic environment we face.”

Dr Debra Carr, DASA Innovation Partner for Scotland, said: “We are delighted to be joining this event. DASA offers fantastic opportunities to fast track the development of your innovations with UK Government funding. We are excited to hear from innovators across the Shetland Islands and to learn about your work.”

You can find out more and register to attend by visiting the event website at https://shetlandspacecentre.com/dasa/

 

New round of space site consultation events to be held in October

A second round of public consultation events is to be held prior to the submission of a full planning application for a vertical launch site at Lamba Ness in Unst for small rockets.

Following the success of the pre-application events held in May, they will again be held online.

However, face-to face-meetings with members of the Shetland Space Centre team will also be available by prior appointment and in compliance with prevailing Covid-19 regulations.

The online events will be held between 4pm and 8pm on Tuesday 13th, Wednesday 14th and Thursday 15th October with face-to-face appointments available in half-hour slots from 10am-12pm and 1-3pm on these days.

The online events will be accessible via www.consultation.shetlandpsacecentre.com and appointments can be booked by emailing [email protected] or telephoning Carol Duncan on 07766 231239.

SSC is seeking planning permission to build a vertical launch spaceport, including a launch pad complex, mobile tracking stations and assembly/integration hangar buildings with associated security fencing, access and servicing at Lamba Ness.

It also intends to create a launch and range control centre at Saxa Vord and construct a new section of access road at Northdale, just north of the former RAF base.

The online consultation events will be attended by the project’s lead planning consultant Alan Farningham, SSC project director Scott Hammond and a variety of specialists who have been carrying out detailed studies as part of the Environmental Impact Assessment that will be submitted in support of the planning application. They will be available to answer questions and provide any additional information or clarification as required.

Similar to the public consultation events held in May, for those interested parties unable to attend or who do not have access to the internet, alternative means will again be made available to contact Shetland Space Centre via post, telephone and email to obtain further information and ask questions.

An updated publicity leaflet and accompanying questionnaire will be delivered to all domestic properties in Unst with the relevant contact information and further details of the proposals.

Although a second round of pre-application community consultation is not a Scottish Government statutory requirement, SSC considers it important that everyone has a further opportunity to comment on the draft proposals before formal submission to Shetland Islands Council for consideration and determination.

SSC project director Scott Hammond said: “Despite some limitations with the online format, the first round of public consultations in May went very well and, following discussions with Unst Community Council, we are conducting the same type of event again in October.

“For those who are unable to attend the online events, face-to-face meetings on each of the days listed with Alan Farningham and myself will be available on request. These will be by appointment only and strictly follow the Scottish Government’s Covid-19 protocols.

“We look forward to engaging with everyone as our proposals progress towards a full planning application being submitted to the council.”

 

Canadian launch company to use SSC as primary launch site

C6 Launch Systems and the Shetland Space Centre today announce the signing of a Letter of Intent for C6 Launch to use the Shetland Space Centre (SCC) in Unst as its primary launch facility.

Richard McCammon, President of C6 Launch, said: “In SCC, C6 Launch finds a perfect partner. Shetland Space Centre will provide all the infrastructure from launchpad to data communications and tracking that we could ask for. Being at the northernmost location in Scotland gives us the latitude we need to insert nano satellites to the perfect orbit.”

C6’s initial orbital launch capability is being designed for 30kg payloads in a 16U configuration to be delivered into a nominal 600km Sun Synchronous Orbit (SSO).

Other orbits, altitudes and payloads are also planned. C6 Launch will provide dedicated launch capacity for nano and CubeSat operators on demand. Shetland Space Centre will house all launch operation facilities, payload processing and integration/assembly facilities, multiple launch pads and a variety of operational and security services.

Frank Strang, CEO of Shetland Space Centre, said: “We are looking forward greatly to this collaboration with C6 Launch Systems.

“Richard and his team have been very clear about their needs and hugely supportive of our plans to provide a route to market for small satellites here in Shetland.”

A 2018 business case by Frost and Sullivan, estimated the potential UK smallsat launch services market at USD$5.5 billion from 2021 to 2030. The report said the existing rideshare market which is growing at 5% a year can only meet less than 35% of the total smallsat launch demand.

According to Frost and Sullivan, rideshare models are not fulfilling smallsat launch demand and a smallsat operator “compromises on orbit based on the primary payload and has a wait period of about 18–24 months”.

Shetland Space Centre recently completed its first community consultation as part of the process toward approval and licensing of launch operations by the UK Government.

SSC expects to complete all submissions to the UK Government by the autumn of this year in order to be approved for launch operations in 2021.

The Shetland location was cited an independent Deimos Sceptre report for the UK Space Agency as the best location in the UK for vertical launch out of eight potential sites. The remote northerly location means rockets can avoid overly populated areas on their way into orbit and is ideally situated for high-demand polar and SSO orbits.

About C6 Launch Systems – Small Payloads – On Time. On Target

C6Launch Systems is a Canadian-based space technology company developing a dedicated small-sat launch capability to place payloads up to 30 kg in a nominal 600 km Sun Synchronous Orbit (SSO). This means that small-sat game changers, first movers and those with urgent operational requirements can deploy payloads where they want, when they want without compromising their orbit or mission. The C6 Rocket utilizes proven, best-in-class capabilities from the engine to the deployer, with integration and other technologies from C6’s talented, expert team of space engineers. C6 is led by veteran entrepreneur Richard McCammon (Delego). For more information visit www.C6launch.com